Guidelines for Digital Journalism Online Video Essay Grading Criteria

 

Instead of writing a final paper in this class that demonstrates your ability to conduct independent but related results, you will compose a 4-8 minute video.

Make sure that your topic has been approved by the instructor!

 

You may want to review the tips about editing video in Journalism 2.0 and the principles of successful Digital Storytelling.

Your instructors are happy to give you feedback on your storyboards, scripts, or rough cuts for this project.

 

You might want to begin by asking yourselves these questions:

Can you say more about a specific topic on the syllabus, such as citizen journalism, news games, 3-D reconstructions of news events, live blogging, etc.

Was there a particular aspect of this subject that you found particularly interesting or significant from the perspective of your personal life, family or community history, or professional goals?

How can you demonstrate your expertise in this video, regardless of whether you are in front of or behind the camera?

Do you have access to original source material (interviews, behind-the-scenes footage, documents, etc.)?

Was there more to say about this subject from the theoretical perspectives of your other communication courses? For example, what do you know about science, surveillance, performance, aesthetics, politics, disability, gender, race, class, or sexuality that might be relevant to this topic?

How can you provide analysis of that particular aspect of digital journalism that lends itself to multimedia storytelling?

How are the editing and shooting techniques that you deploy similar to the techniques that you would use in a good class blog posting? How are they different?

 

Video Composition Grading Criteria

A

An "A" video project approaches its subject in creative and innovative ways with an argument that is compelling both visually and verbally. Such a project achieves significant persuasive goals that could not have been realized only working on paper. However, much like an "A" research paper written for any other upper-division course, an "A" video project has a clearly articulated thesis, displays substantial research and thoughtful engagement, and uses a variety of types of sources. Design decisions demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of media production, and the effectiveness of the project is uncompromised by technical problems.The project applies principles from the study of digital journalism aptly and extends readings, class discussions, and case studies into original but relevant examples and analysis.

The approach to the topic of study is insightful, and/or creative, persuasive, unique, and worth developing; the level of thinking/analysis is strong. Strong connection to class material about digital journalism.

B

A"B" video project approaches its subject in coherent and logical ways with an argument that is competent both visually and verbally. Such a project uses multimodal composition to improve on a point that could also have been made on paper. However, much like a "B" research paper written for any other upper-division course, a "B" video essay demonstrates that the student can present him or herself as a credible source on a topic and script coherent and engagng arguments that are supported by additional material and satisfactory evidence. Design decisions are deliberate and controlled, and there are very few technical problems.

The approach is acceptable, reasonable, thoughtful; the level of thinking/analysis is appropriate. Solid connection to class material about digital journalism.

C

A "C" video project approaches its subject in a generic or uneven manner with an argument that is satisfactory both visually and verbally. Such a project may barely meet the most basic research criteria. Often "C" video projects only partially develop arguments, fail to go beyond shallow analysis, leave ideas and generalizations undeveloped or unsupported, and make limited use of textual or visual evidence. Design decisions sometimes appear arbitrary or distracting, and there may be noticeable technical problems. It may rely overly much on clich├ęs or stereotypes and use stock images inappropriately.

The approach is occasionally adequate; some evidence of thinking/analysis, or an attempt at analysis, is evident; the ideas offered are intermittently delineated, thought-through, and appropriate to the task. General connection to class material about digital journalism.

D

A "D" video project approaches its subject with little evidence of careful thought and time spent on revision and editing. The argument it is presenting is confused or noticeably biased. It may lack required elements of the video process; it may inappropriately cite or use sources. Parts of the project may be illegible or difficult to hear. Design decisions appear accidental.

The approach is inadequate or confusing; little or no evidence of critical thinking and analysis are evident; although some of the ideas may be worthwhile, the level of insight and clarity of presentation are lacking; the video creator does not take into account other facets or perspectives, or does so in an inappropriate or simplistic manner. Weak connection to class material about digital journalism.

F

An "F" video project is incomplete, plagiarized, or in violation of university policies on academic speech.

No connection to class material about digital journalism.